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ITS Home Water Quality Test Kit

Home Water Quality Analysis Testing Kit Bacteria Nitrate Nitrite Iron Hardness Chlorine pH Alkalinity Chloride Sulfate Copper Hydrogen Lead Pesticide Sulfide Industrial Test Systems ITS Sensafe
 
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IT-487986
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PRODUCT DETAILS EDUCATIONAL INFO
 

Features

  • Easy to use kit provides a convenient way to check your water for 13 of the top water quality contaminant concerns.
  • Do-it-yourself test kit. Everything needed to perform and analyze the tests are included.
  • The tests are fast and provide you with results right at home in seconds. Bacteria test takes 48 hours.
  • Clear directions, easy methods and top quality non-toxic test ingredientsassure you of reliable test results.
  • Requires no technical training, instrumentation, powders, liquids or tablets.
  • EPA-based, laboratory certified test kit includes:
    • 1 - Bacteria Test
    • 2 - Free Chlorine Tests
    • 2 - Nitrate Tests
    • 2 - Nitrite Tests
    • 2 - Hardness Tests
    • 2 - Total Chlorine Test
    • 2 - pH Tests
    • 2 - Total Alkalinity Tests
    • 2 - Iron Tests
    • 1 - Lead Test
    • 2 - Copper Tests
    • 1 - Pesticide Test
    • 2 - Sulfate Tests
    • 2 - Chloride Tests
    • 2 - Hydrogen Sulfide Tests

Contaminants Tested

Lead

Lead is a metal found in natural deposits as ores containing other elements. Is is used in many manufacturing processes and in mining and smelting. According to the US EPA Toxics Release Inventory, over 144 million pounds of lead was released into the water and land between 1987 and 1993 in the U.S.. It is sometimes used in household plumbing materials or in water service lines to bring water from the main water line to the home. Lead may occur in drinking water either by contamination of the source water used by the water system, or by corrosion of lead plumbing and/or lead solder used in plumbing or plumbing fixtures. In 1996 & 1998, the U.S. Congress restricted the use of lead in pipes, solder and other components use in drinking water systems. Corrosion of plumbing is by far the greatest cause for concern. All water is corrosive to metal plumbing materials to some degree. Grounding of household electrical systems to plumbing may also exacerbate corrosion. Since lead contamination generally occurs from corrosion of household lead pipes or lead supply lines, it cannot be directly detected or removed by the public water system.

Health Effects - Lead can cause a variety of adverse health effects when people are exposed to it at levels above the MCL for relatively short periods of time. These effects may include interference with red blood cell chemistry, delays in normal physical and mental development in babies and young children, slight deficits in the attention span, hearing, and learning abilities of children, and slight increases in the blood pressure of some adults. Lead has the potential to cause stroke, kidney disease and cancer from a lifetime exposure at levels above the MCL.

EPA Recommended Contaminant Level

  • Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) - 0 milligrams per liter (mg/L) (negative presence).
  • Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) - 0.015 milligrams per liter (mg/L) or 15 parts per billion (ppb).

Pesticides

A pesticide is a chemical that is used to control or kill a pest such as an insect, weed, fungus, bacteria, rodent or other troublesome organism. These products are used in residential and commercial applications, on public land and for agricultural purposes. Pesticides get into our drinking water through runoff from application sites, seepage through the soil into groundwater, spills and illegal dumping, manufacturing discharge, direct application in water bodies to control water related pests and through inappropriate discharge into wastewater or septic systems that enters groundwater. Two common pesticides are Atrazine and Simazine. Atrazine was the second most frequently detected pesticide in US EPA's National Survey of Pesticides in Drinking Water Wells and was estimated to be the most heavily used herbicide in the United States in 1987/89. Simazine is applied directly or is commonly combined with other herbicides and in 1985, it was estimated 4.8 billion pounds of Simazine was used annually.

Health Effects - Pesticides have varying effects on humans depending on the type and toxicity of the pesticide and the sensitivity of the individual based on weight, age, health, etc. EPA has found Atrazine to potentially cause congestion of heart, lungs and kidneys, low blood pressure, muscle spasms, weight loss and damage to adrenal glands and Simazine to cause weight loss and changes in blood under short term exposure above maximum contaminant levels. Long term exposure to Atrazine may cause weight loss, cardiovascular damage, retinal and some muscle degeneration and cancer. Long term exposure to Simazine includes tremors, damage to testes, kidneys, liver and thyroid, gene mutations and cancer.

EPA Recommended Contaminant Level for Atrazine

  • Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) - 0.003 milligrams per liter (mg/L) or 3 parts per billion (ppb).
  • Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) - 0.003 milligrams per liter (mg/L) or 3 parts per billion (ppb).

EPA Recommended Contaminant Level for Simazine

  • Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) - 0.004 milligrams per liter (mg/L) or 4 parts per billion (ppb).
  • Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) - 0.004 milligrams per liter (mg/L) or 4 parts per billion (ppb).
Bacteria

This test checks for the presence of E.coli (Escherichia coli) bacteria. E.coli is a type of fecal coliform bacteria commonly found in the intestines of animals and humans and is closely associated with recent fecal contamination. During rain precipitation and water runoffs, E.coli may be washed into surface and groundwater where they can survive if the water is not treated. If any E.coli is present in the water sample, then it is likely that the water has recent sewage or animal waste contamination and may contain many types of disease causing organisms.

Health Effects - Symptoms of bacterial infection can cause diarrhea, abdominal cramps and in severe cases with children under 5 years and the elderly, some bacteria infections can cause red blood cells to be destroyed and kidneys to fail.

EPA Recommended Contaminant Level

  • Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) - 0 milligrams per liter (mg/L) (negative presence).
  • Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) - more than 5% total Coliform positive tests in a month (public water suppliers).

Nitrates/Nitrites

Nitrates and nitrites are nitrogen-oxygen chemical units which combine with various organic and inorganic compounds. Once taken into the body, nitrates are converted into nitrites. The greatest use of nitrates is as a fertilizer. Most nitrogenous materials in natural waters tend to be converted to nitrate, so all sources of combined nitrogen, particularly organic nitrogen and ammonia, should be considered as potential nitrate sources. Primary sources of organic nitrates include human sewage and livestock manure, especially from feedlots. The primary inorganic nitrates which may contaminate drinking water are potassium nitrate and ammonium nitrate both of which are widely used as fertilizers. According to the US EPA Toxics Release Inventory, releases to water and land totaled over 112 million pounds from 1991 through 1993. Since they are very soluble and do not bind to soils, nitrates have a high potential to migrate to ground water. Because they do not evaporate, nitrates/nitrites are likely to remain in water until consumed by plants or other organisms.

Health Effects - Excessive levels of nitrate above the maximum contaminant level in drinking water has caused serious illness and sometimes death from short term exposure. The serious illness in infants is due to the conversion of nitrate to nitrite by the body, which can interfere with the oxygen-carrying capacity of the child's blood. This can be an acute condition in which health deteriorates rapidly over a period of days. Symptoms include shortness of breath and blueness of the skin. Long-term exposure to excessive levels of Nitrates and Nitrites have the potential to cause diuresis, increased starchy deposits and hemorrhaging of the spleen.

EPA Recommended Contaminant Level for Nitrate

  • Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) - 10 milligrams per liter (mg/L) or 10 parts per million (ppm).
  • Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) - 10 milligrams per liter (mg/L) or 10 parts per million (ppm).

EPA Recommended Contaminant Level for Nitrite

  • Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) - 1 milligram per liter (mg/L) or 1 part per million (ppm).
  • Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) - 1 milligram per liter (mg/L) or 1 part per million (ppm).

pH

A measurement of the degree of how acid or alkaline the water supply is based on a pH scale of 0 - 14. A pH reading of 7.0 is considered neutral and neither acid or alkaline. Numbers below 7.0 are considered acidic, numbers above 7.0 are considered alkaline. Each full number change in the pH scale up or down represents a 10 fold increase in degree of acidity or alkalinity. For example, a pH reading of 4.0 is 10 times more acidic than a reading of 5.0 and 100 times more acidic than a reading of 6.0. There can be many causes for acidic water including acid rain (high carbon dioxide), acid source water from absorbing atmospheric carbon dioxide and from decaying vegetation and no acid buffering characteristics in the water. Alkaline waters can be caused by unwanted substances such as alkali or ammonia from nitrate fertilizer finding its way into your water and excessive carbonates. pH is a non-mandatory secondary water quality standard and guidelines are provided to assist in managing drinking water for aesthetic considerations such as taste, color and odor as well as for corrosion control.

Aesthetic Effects - Excessive levels of alkalinity can produce a "soda" taste and have a drying effect on the skin because of the tendency to remove normal skin oils. Water that is acidic or very alkaline will tend to be corrosive. This corrosive water will begin to dissolve metals such as lead, copper, brass and zinc in the plumbing lines and carry them in the water to the faucet or water appliance such as washing machines, water heaters and plumbing fixtures.

EPA Recommended Contaminant Level

  • Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level (SMCL) - pH 6.5 to 8.5.

Chlorine

Chlorine is used an an oxidizing agent to change the chemical composition of targeted substances. It is helpful in the removal of Iron, Manganese and Hydrogen Sulfide from water and it is also used to disinfect water and kill microorganisms. Chlorine is added in municipal water treatment and may also be used on a small scale in residential water treatment systems. Chlorine added to the water will first react with Iron, Manganese and Hydrogen Sulfide through the oxidation process and then some of the Chlorine will be neutralized by any organic matter and bacteria present in the water, this is the "Chlorine Demand". The remaining Chlorine present in the water is called "Residual Chlorine". If any Ammonia is present in the water, Residual Chlorine will react with it to form Chloramines. If no Ammonia is present, the remaining Chlorine is called "Free Chlorine". "Total Chlorine" is the combination of the Residual Chlorine that has formed Chloramines and Free Chlorine levels. Today, most municipalities are turning to the application of Chloramine, a compound of chlorine and ammonia, instead of Chlorine products to help reduce the amount of disinfection byproducts. However, this treatment method still leaves "Free" Chlorine present in water.

Health Effects - Chlorine can react with organic matter in the water, such as from vegetation decay, and form disinfection byproducts called Trihalomethanes (THM's). THM's are suspected human carcinogens. Chlorine may also create objectionable taste and odor problems in water. Chlorine can be irritating to the skin upon contact as well as an eye, nose and lung irritant when exposure to the air is encountered. Ingestion of Chlorine can cause stomach discomfort.

EPA Recommended Contaminant Level

  • Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG) - 4.0 milligrams per liter (mg/L) or 4 parts per million as free chlorine.
  • Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL) - 4.0 milligrams per liter (mg/L) or 4 parts per million as free chlorine.

Hardness

A US Geological Survey indicates hard water is found in over 85% of the United States. Hardness is a common water quality problem that relates to the amount of dissolved minerals present in water. As water travels through the ground, rock and soil, it picks up minerals along the way. The primary mineral substances that are associated with water hardness are calcium and magnesium. These minerals are not found in nature in their elemental form but found in water principally as chlorides, sulfates, carbonates and bicarbonates.

Aesthetic Effects - Hardness reduces a soap or detergent's ability to clean and lather by causing the development of insoluble precipitation in water. This is the soap scum seen in the shower, toilets and on tubs as well as whitish scale deposits in pipes, water heaters and coffee makers. Water hardness makes washing clothes, bathing and shampooing more difficult and less effective. More soap will be required in hard water to have the same effectiveness as in soft water. Hardness will also cause scale buildup on water lines and in appliances such as water heaters. It can cause the reduction in water flow through pipes and make heating appliances less effective and more costly to run due to the poor heat transmission through the scale buildup.

WQA Hardness Standards

  • No EPA standards exist for the municipal control of water hardness. The Water Quality Association (WQA) has established hardness standards. The measurement for water hardness is either in grains per gallon (gpg) or milligrams per liter (mg/L)/parts per million (ppm).

Hardness Level

gpg

mg/L or ppm

Soft

less than 1.0

less than 17.1

Slightly Hard

1.0 to 3.5

17.1 to 60

Moderately Hard

3.5 to 7.0

60 to 120

Hard

7.0 to 10.5

120 to 180

Very Hard

10.5 and above

180 and above

Iron

A very common element in groundwater and an EPA Secondary Drinking Water Regulated Contaminant. Considered one of the "Troublesome Trio" (along with Manganese and Hydrogen Sulfide) because of the complexity in removing this excess contaminant. More common in private wells than municipal water supplies. Iron can be present in four different forms in water. Ferrous Iron is colorless and is the result of changing the insoluble element Iron to a soluble form in acidic and low oxygen environments. Ferric Iron is the result of air exposure to form insoluble Iron (rust) and red-brown staining of plumbing fixtures and laundry. Organic Iron or Iron Bacteria occurs when specific microorganisms utilize Ferrous Iron and air to produce a gelatinous compound. Colloidal Iron is observed as suspended matter causing red-pink discoloration to water. Iron is a non-mandatory secondary water quality standard and guidelines are provided to assist in managing drinking water for aesthetic considerations such as taste, color and odor as well as for corrosion control.

Aesthetic Effects - Excessive Iron will create a rusty color with reddish or orange staining of plumbing fixtures. A metallic taste may also be present with excess Iron. If Iron Bacteria is present, gelatinous sludge may be present on plumbing fixtures or cause pipe encrustation.

EPA Recommended Contaminant Level

  • Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level (SMCL) - 0.3 milligrams per liter (mg/L) or .3 parts per million.

Copper

Copper is an essential nutrient for good health when ingested in very small quantities and is a naturally occurring element found in natural deposits as ores containing other elements. Copper is also used extensively in household plumbing. Copper can be found in drinking water by contamination from mining operations or municipal incineration deposits leaching into groundwater. According to the EPA Toxics Release Inventory, 40 million pounds of copper compounds were released to the land and water between 1987 to 1993. Corrosion in household Copper plumbing from acidic water is another source of excess copper levels in drinking water.

Health and Aesthetic Effects - When people are exposed to Copper above the EPA Action Level, short term exposure can cause gastrointestinal problems such as nausea and vomiting. Long term exposure can cause liver or kidney damage. Excessive levels of Copper can cause blue/green staining of plumbing fixtures and a metallic taste.

EPA Recommended Contaminant Level

  • Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) - 1.3 milligrams per liter (mg/L) or 1.3 parts per million (ppm).
  • Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) - 1.3 milligrams per liter (mg/L) or 1.3 parts per million (ppm). If more than 10% of tap water samples exceed the action level, water systems must take additional steps.

Alkalinity

A measurement of the capacity of water to neutralize an acid. For example, how much acid can be added to a liquid without causing a significant change in pH. Alkalinity is different than pH because water doesn't have to be highly basic (high pH) to be considered to have highly Alkalinity. Moderate concentrations of Alkalinity are desirable to balance any corrosiveness effects of acidity. Alkalinity (as Total Dissolved Solids) is a non-mandatory secondary water quality standard and guidelines are provided to assist in managing drinking water for aesthetic considerations such as taste, color and odor as well as for corrosion control.

Aesthetic Effects - Excessive levels of alkalinity can produce a "soda" taste and have a drying effect on the skin because of the tendency to remove normal skin oils.

EPA Recommended Contaminant Level

  • Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level (SMCL) - 500 milligrams per liter (mg/L) or 500 parts per million (ppm) measured as Total Dissolved Solids. Less than 50 mg/L are not objectionable, over 100 mg/L may give water a "soda" taste and over 400 mg/L may cause dry skin and hair when bathing.

Sulfate

Sulfates are naturally found in most waters and the amount will vary depending on geographic area. It is a colorless and odorless compound of Sulfur and Oxygen and exists as a dissolved salt in water. High Sulfate generally means you will likely have hard water because of Sulfate's ability to combine with Calcium and Magnesium. High Sulfates will usually correspond to high Sodium levels and high acidity in your water also. Low to moderate concentrations of Sulfate may actually make water more palatable and desirable to drink. Sulfates contribute to the total mineral content of water.

Health and Aesthetic Effects - High levels of sulfates will produce a medicinal taste and can cause a laxative effect on the digestive system if you are not accustomed to drinking water with high sulfates.

EPA Recommended Contaminant Level

  • Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level (SMCL) - 250 milligrams per liter (mg/L) or 250 parts per million (ppm).

Hydrogen Sulfide

A flammable and corrosive gas present in some waters that produces an easily detected offensive "rotten egg" smell to water. It is produced by decaying organic matter, petroleum refining and from Sulfate Reducing Bacteria (bacteria that can convert Sulfates and Sulfur to Sulfide). Hydrogen Sulfide is also a weak acid and can also promote corrosion in plumbing lines. More common to well waters than to treated municipal water supplies.

Aesthetic Effects - Excess Hydrogen Sulfide can cause an objectionable smell to water and be corrosive to plumbing lines. Odor can be detected in water with a level of 0.5 milligrams per liter (mg/L) by most people. A "swampy" or "musty" odor can be detected below 1.0 milligrams per liter (mg/L). Concentration of Hydrogen Sulfide over 1.0 milligrams per liter (mg/L) will give water a "rotten egg" smell and makes water corrosive to plumbing.

Recommended Contaminant Level

  • No EPA or industry standard contaminant level is established for Hydrogen Sulfide.

Chloride

In small amounts, Chloride is found in most natural waters and the concentration depends on the mineral content of the earth through which the water flows. Naturally occurring high Chloride levels generally means you will likely have hard water because of Chloride's ability to combine with calcium and magnesium. Low to moderate concentrations of Chloride may actually make water more palatable and desirable to drink. Chlorides contribute to the total mineral content of water.

Aesthetic Effects - Chloride will produce a salty taste in water and high concentrations it will cause a brackish or briny taste which is undesirable.

EPA Recommended Contaminant Level

  • Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level (SMCL) - 250 milligrams per liter (mg/L) or 250 parts per million (ppm).

Definitions

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) - The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety and are non-enforceable public health goals.

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) - The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology and taking cost into consideration. This is the lowest level to which water systems can reasonably be required to control this contaminant should it occur in drinking water at their customer's home taps. MCLs are enforceable standards.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG) - The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL) - The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level (SMCL) - Non-mandatory water quality standards for 15 contaminants. EPA does not enforce these "secondary maximum contaminant levels" or "SMCLs." They are established only as guidelines to assist public water systems in managing their drinking water for aesthetic considerations, such as taste, color and odor. These contaminants are not considered to present a risk to human health at the SMCL.

Testing Procedure

Important

  • Keep tests out of reach of children and pets. Do not ingest anything from this test kit. Do not drink water sample used for testing. Store and use at room temperature (60-86 F).
  • Do not open packets or a vial until you are ready to perform the tests.
  • Do not touch test pads.
  • Do not use on hot water or water containing bleach detergents.
  • Do not re-use any part of the test kit.
  • Read and follow all instructions carefully.

Lead Instructions

  1. Open Lead foil packet and take out contents. The packet contains a test vial, a dropper pipette, one Lead test strip and a desiccant (to be discarded).
  2. Using dropper, Place water sample into test vial. To pick up the sample, tightly squeeze the bulb at the end of the dropper and place the open end into the water sample. Release the bulb to pick up the sample, then squeeze again to expel the sample into the vial. Use only 6 drops of water into the vial.
  3. Swirl vial gently for several seconds. Place on a flat surface.
  4. Place Lead test strip into the test vial, with arrows pointing DOWN.
  5. Wait 10 minutes. DO not disturb strip or vial during this time. Blue lines will appear on the strips.
  6. Take the strips out of the vial and read results.

Lead Results

Negative: Bottom line (next to number 1) is darker then the top line (next to number 2). If you only see one line next to number 1, the test is negative.
Lead or Pesticide Test Results
Positive: Top line (next to number 2) is darker than bottom line (next to number 1), or lines are equally dark.
Lead or Pesticide Test Results

Note: If no lines appear, or both lines are very light, the test did not run properly and the result is not valid. If a test strip shows a positive result, your water sample may contain Lead at a toxic level.

Pesticide Instructions

  1. Open Pesticide foil packet and take out contents. The packet contains a test vial, a dropper pipette, one Pesticide test strip and a desiccant (to be discarded).
  2. Using dropper, Place 1-2 drops of water sample into test vial. To pick up the sample, tightly squeeze the bulb at the end of the dropper and place the open end into the water sample. Release the bulb to pick up the sample, then squeeze again to expel 1-2 drops of the sample into the vial.
  3. Swirl vial gently for several seconds. Place on a flat surface.
  4. Place both test strips into the test vial, with arrows pointing DOWN.
  5. Wait 10 minutes. DO not disturb strips or vial during this time. Blue lines will appear on the strips.
  6. Take the strips out of the vial and read results.

Pesticide Results

Negative: Bottom line (next to number 1) is darker then the top line (next to number 2). If you only see one line next to number 1, the test is negative.
Lead or Pesticide Test Results 
Positive: Top line (next to number 2) is darker than bottom line (next to number 1), or lines are equally dark.
Lead or Pesticide Test Results

Note: If no lines appear, or both lines are very light, the test did not run properly and the result is not valid. If a test strip shows a positive result, your water sample may contain pesticides at a toxic level.

pH, Total Alkalinity, Total Chlorine and Total Hardness Instructions

  1. Dip one test strip into water sample with constant, gentle back-and-forth motion for 5 seconds.
  2. Remove, shake once briskly, wait 20 seconds.
  3. Match color for pH, Total Alkalinity, Total Chlorine and Total Hardness in this order with provided color chart in kit.
  4. Complete color matching within 10 seconds.

Nitrate/Nitrite Nitrogen Instructions

  1. Dip one test strip into water sample for 2 seconds
  2. Remove, wait 1 minute (2 minutes if water temperature is below 55¡ãF), then match colors for Nitrate/Nitrite Nitrogen with provided color chart in kit.
  3. Colors are stable for 2 minutes.

Free Chlorine Instructions

  1. Dip one test strip into 2 oz. water sample with constant, gentle back-and-forth motion for 20 seconds.
  2. Remove, shake once briskly, wait 20 seconds.
  3. Match color for Free Chlorine with provided color chart in kit.

Iron Instructions

  1. Dip one test strip into a 8oz. water sample for 5 seconds with a constant, gentle back-and-forth motion.
  2. Remove the strip and shake once, briskly, to remove excess water.
  3. Wait 15 seconds then view through the aperture to match with closest color.
  4. Complete color matching within 15 seconds with provided color chart in kit.

Sulfate Instructions

  1. Dip one test strip into water sample with constant, gentle back-and-forth motion for 10 seconds.
  2. Remove, shake once briskly to remove excess water, wait 20 seconds.
  3. Match color for Sulfate.
  4. Complete color matching within 30 seconds with provided color chart in kit.

Copper Instructions

  1. Dip one test strip into a 8oz. water sample for 15 seconds with a constant, gentle back-and-forth motion.
  2. Remove the strip and shake once, briskly, to remove excess water.
  3. Wait 30 seconds then view through the aperture to match with closest color.
  4. Complete color matching within 15 seconds with provided color chart in kit.

Chloride Instructions

  1. Dip one test strip into water sample with constant, gentle back-and-forth motion for 5 seconds.
  2. Remove, shake once briskly to remove excess water, wait 25 seconds.
  3. Match color for Chloride.
  4. Complete color matching within 10 seconds with provided color chart in kit.

Hydrogen Sulfide Instructions

  1. Fill two supplied vials up to the line with water sample to be tested.
  2. Set one vial aside to be used as reference vial.
  3. Dip one Hydrogen Sulfide test strip into one vial fro 20 seconds with a constant, gentle back and forth motion.
  4. Remove the strip from the vial.

Hydrogen Sulfide Results

  1. Set the vials on a white surface.
  2. Look down into the vials and compare the colors.
  3. If the ample vial is beige or light tan when compared to the reference vial, then a minimum of approximately 0.2 ppm of Hydrogen Sulfide is present.
  4. If the sample vial is brown, Hydrogen Sulfide is present at a concentration of approximately 2.0 ppm or greater.
  5. Complete the comparison within one minute.

Bacteria Instructions

  1. Turn on on water at the tap to a slow steady stream.
  2. Carefully remove the cap from the supplied Bacteria Check bottle
  3. Fill bottle to 1/2 inch below the top (to 5 ml line). DO NOT OVERFILL and DO NOT SPILL the bacterial growth powder in the vial.
  4. Replace cap and twist on tightly. Shake the bottle vigorously for 20 seconds.
  5. Place the capped bottle upright in a warm area (70-90 F) away from sunlight, where it cannot be disturbed for 48 hrs.

Bacteria Results

  1. After 48 hrs., observe the color of the liquid in the bottle without opening the bottle.
  2. If the color stays Purple, then no harmful bacteria growth was detected and the test was negative.
  3. If the color turns from Purple to Yellow, then it is highly likely bacteria growth caused the color change and the tested water should be considered unsafe.
Specifications

Test

Sensitivity

Test Range

Result Time

Iron

0.1 ppm

0 to 1 ppm

15 seconds

Copper

0.5 ppm

0 to 2 ppm

30 seconds

Chloride

250 ppm

0 to 500 ppm

25 seconds

Nitrate

2.0 ppm

0 to 50 ppm

1 minute

Nitrite

0.2 ppm

0 to 3 ppm

1 minute

pH

1.0

2 to 12

20 seconds

Total Alkalinity

40 ppm

0 to 500 ppm

20 seconds

Total Chlorine

0.2 ppm

0 to 10 ppm

20 seconds

Total Hardness

50 ppm

0 to 1000 ppm

20 seconds

Free Chlorine

0.05 ppm

0 to 10 ppm

20 seconds

Sulfate

250 ppm

0 to 500 ppm

20 seconds

Hydrogen Sulfide

0.3 ppm

0.2 ppm to ≥ 2 ppm

30 seconds

Bacteria

1 colony per 100 ml

present/absent

48 hours

Lead

15 ppm

present/absent

10 minutes

Pesticide Atrazine

3 ppm

present/absent

10 minutes

Pesticide Simazine

4 ppm

present/absent

10 minutes



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